March 2013 Seminar: Knowledge management: past, present and future

Summary

Summary:
Stuart Ward was the original founder of NetIKX when it evolved from previous Information Management groups. He led the meeting through the changes in KM since then and provided a model of how to help our businesses see the value of KM.
Lissi gave an overview of her research into three case studies showing how KM has been used in charity organisations. She was able to draw out some of the factors in the success of these programmes as well as some of the problems to avoid!

Speakers

Stuart Ward, Forward Consulting, established Forward Consulting in 1997 to specialise in Business Change Management, HR, and Information Management. He set up Forward Knowledge Consulting in 2003 to provide knowledge management consultancy. Prior to 1997 he had over 8 years as a senior company director in the electricity industry with experience of IS and business management at executive team level in commercial, public and private sector organisations. He has a track record of achievements in information management and IT, major business change management, HR, quality improvement, business process redesign, project management and cost reduction. He has excellent communication, team building, business analysis, project management and influencing skills.
He was the founding member of NetIKX (Network for Information and Knowledge Exchange) in 2007, first Chairman until July 2008.

Specialties: Change management, information and knowledge management practice, policy, strategy and performance assessment (Knowledge and Information Index). He believes in creating business value through better use of information and knowledge. He knows about recruitment processes and practice. He is an accredited police SEARCH Assessor. He lectures at University level.

Lissi Corfield, The Knowledge Advantage, was Head of IT at VSO, (Voluntary Service Overseas) for many years and has recently gained a PhD in Knowledge Management from the Open University. Her study was based on research in three major UK charities.

Time and Venue

March 2013, 2pm The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx60

Blog

See our blog report: Knowledge Management: past, present and future – notes on a NetIKX seminar
There must be a blog link added here

Study Suggestions

See also Val Skelton for Information Today: Knowledge management: past, present and future https://www.infotoday.eu/Articles/Editorial/Featured-Articles/Knowledge-management-past-present-and-future-88569.aspx

May 2013 Seminar: Managing change

Summary

The successful management of change is essential for organisations in order to achieve positive outcomes when implementing new or revised policies, procedures and projects. During the seminar we discussed how to go about successful change management.
In an introduction we learnt that the majority of change projects fail – countless studies have found between a 60-80% failure rate for organisational change projects. So we were pleased to hear the speakers gave us their tips for successful projects! She focused on how to develop online communities during organisational changes and prove their value.
Online communities have an important role to play in our society – some have changed the world… Indymedia (started World Trade Organisation (WTO) protests), Occupy Wall Street, Howard Dean‘s presidential campaign via Moveon.org (he set up natural and real communities in every state, which Obama copied for his election campaign) and most famous of all, Julian Assange and Wikileaks. They also talked about the impact of good of anecdotes. Find your success stories and make sure you get them heard!

Speakers

Lesley Trenner, Change Coach, a highly qualified and respected Change Coach specialising in leadership, career and midlife transitions. She has coached hundreds of clients ranging from top executives to job-seekers to people facing mid-life challenges like redundancy, career change or eldercare.

Janet Kaul, Knowledge Officer, NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre. Janet provides project and content management for the main website, as well as a personalisation site and corporate search tool. She handles service delivery, including writing business requirements and logging, tracking, and escalating bug fixes for those systems, and liaising with internal IT and vendors. Other responsibilities include handling business analysis, analytics, information architecture, taxonomy, testing, training on web systems, and user engagement. She consulted on the information architecture and usability of multiple other NHS websites, did training on corporate values, and assisted with projects including knowledge transfers, business process improvements, publications, intranet planning, and new employee orientation. She created and maintained a knowledge toolkit for retaining project and employee knowledge, and managed the transition of the corporate website into a new content management system, including tightening up the content and creating a new information architecture.

Before joining the web team, she did corporate knowledge management, setting up a knowledge library and running harvests and retrospectives, as well as managing a corporate library and knowledge networking site. She created a knowledge management group for NHS knowledge managers and spoke at various knowledge and information management seminars.

Time and Venue

May the 13th, 2pm The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Slides

Both presentations were available to NetIKX members at netikx.org in the Resources section.

Tweets

#netikx59

Blog

See our blog report: Managing change seminar

July 2013 Seminar: Data protection: the good, the bad and the future

Summary

Dave provided an update on the Data Protection situation in the UK and presented us with an excellent insider view of what will be important in the near future.

Speakers

Dave Evans, Senior Policy Officer, Information Commissioner’s Office. Dave has worked on local govt, health and education information governance issues including:
The DCLG’s Transparency Code of Practice; he led the ICO’s work on the information governance parts of the Health and Social Care Act; the data protection and confidentiality implications of the secondary uses of health information, especially in connection with medical research;
sharing medical information across EU member states; pharmacovigilance and data protection;
he worked with Universities UK and the Research Information Network to improve freedom of information awareness across higher education.

Time and Venue

July 2013, 2pm The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Slides

No slides available for this presentation
Link to the slides if the speakers had agreed we can do this.

Tweets

#netikx58

September 2013 Seminar: Title: The Knowledge Council and the KIM professional

Summary

Karen took us on a tour of the Knowledge Council’s work so that we were all aware of the latest developments in the Government’s thinking. She encouraged us to be encouraged by the Government’s serious embrace of KIM ideas and practices.

Speakers

Karen McFarlane, Chair of the Government’s Knowledge Council and Government Head of Profession for Knowledge and Information Management (KIM) a Specialist with extensive experience of operating at senior levels as a knowledge and information professional in the UK government sector. She is experienced in: information management; knowledge management; records management – paper and electronic; intranet management; information governance; information risk management; information security; library and Information services.

Time and Venue

September 2013, 2pm The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx57

Blog

See our blog report: ‘True tacit knowledge can’t be passed on when people leave…’ by Paul J. Corney
There must be a blog link added here

November 2013 Seminar: Knowledge organisation past present and future

Summary

This event was all about information and knowledge management within organisations. The speakers looked at how IKM has evolved and where it’s likely to go next.
David Skryme talked about capturing the most important information as being a vital part of knowledge management. Communities are essential for developing tacit knowledge, through people talking to other people and sharing their knowledge. Work organisations are really social places, about human relationships and people. Storytelling has come back into popularity as a tool for knowledge managers to bring knowledge management to life. There are many new KM challenges now – social media, visualisation, ramification, co-creation with customers. David encouraged us to look beyond the appeal of new innovations to remember that there was a good amount of solid knowledge management techniques already out there.
Next Danny Budzak talked us through how he is developing data, information and knowledge management at the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC), in his role as Senior Information Manager. He drew out useful tips that would be relevant to his audiences’ own workplaces.

In conclusion the speakers suggested that: “The true success of knowledge management is when it disappears”. KM will be stronger when it becomes part and parcel of working life.

Speakers

Dr David Skryme, Analyst and Management Consultant at David Skryme Associates, is a world recognized expert on knowledge management. In a 22-year career with Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), he held a variety of management roles in marketing, strategic planning and product management. During his career he was responsible for introducing new thinking, new products and services, new methods, and new initiatives.
He set up his own company in 1993 with three strands of activity – consultancy, workshops, research/writing. He has had clients across the world, ranging from large multinationals to small charities. He is a member of the ENTOVATION Network. The ENTOVATION Network is an international network of theorists and practitioners dedicated to developing a sustainable future through knowledge and innovation.

Danny Budzak, Senior Information Manager at the London Legacy Development Corporation is our second speaker and is Currently working at the London Legacy Development Corporation on the review, transfer and disposal of electronic and paper records; information transfer approach, retention and disposal schedule, stakeholder engagement, information governance and information security.

Time and Venue

November the 26th, 2pm The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx56

Blog

See our blog report: Knowledge organisation – past, present and future

January 2020 Seminar: Virtual working and learning: is it working for you?

Summary

NetIKX had a dazzling meeting with Paul Corney, President-elect of CILIP, showing his wealth of knowledge about meetings of all kinds, and specifically virtual meetings.  The presentation ranged from detailed analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of technology packages – where he pulled out some surprising issues to watch out for – to the preparation and etiquette that makes humans effective when working together at a distance.  That was to be expected from someone who had once been managed by a boss located on the far side of the globe!  The meeting culminated in a vote among those present to find our most useful takeaways.   To learn what we decided, please look at our blog! All in all, the seminar featured lots of fun and instructive anecdotes, takeaways for the workplace, and finally networking with refreshments – it turned out to be a perfect NetIKX event.

Speakers

Paul Corney is Managing Director of Knowledge et al. A long-time business consultant with broad global experience, he spent 25 years in London as Senior Manager at Saudi International Bank and as Vice President at Zurich Reinsurance before becoming the Strategy & Business Advisor to the CEO of a dotcom software organization (Sopheon PLC) and Information & Knowledge Advisor to the CEO of a leading reinsurance broker (BMS Group). As such, he was one of the first ‘knowledge managers’ in London. Outside of work, Corney is a founding trustee of PlanZheores, a London-based charitable organization whose aim is to make good use of surplus food. He regularly speaks and holds Master Classes at international events on information and knowledge management and is a member of the British Standards Institute KM Standards Committee (KMS/1).

Time and Venue

Wednesday 29th January 2020. 2pm The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

Following Paul’s presentation, we will have a group exercise where we will sketch a typology of virtual meeting scenarios, technologies that may underpin them, and what they make either easy or difficult. We’ll also share our own experiences of virtual meeting spaces and try to find rules of thumb whereby we can make such gatherings work better. There will then be an opportunity to network over drinks and nibbles.  Do come along and join us, as we haven’t yet found a technology for pouring a complimentary glass of wine for remote participants!

Slides

 

Further slides will be available in due course.

Tweets

#netikx101
Blog

See our blog report: Keeping the show on the road in a virtual world

Study Suggestions

Erin Meyer

 

July 2019 Seminar: Using content strategy to meet your business goals: content strategy at work

Summary

The seminar in July received very positive feedback. The two speakers were able to present their different perspectives on this practical topic with expertise and they coordinated together like the perfect double act! The audience learnt from first hand experience how to work through the four stages of Content Strategy development, and then had a chance to question the speakers so that the presentation could be directly linked to current real life examples. There was a final syndicate session that gave all present the opportunity to try their skills in a potential problem situation. Several of the audience members commented that what they had learnt from the session was immediately applicable to their own work situations and therefore would be in use by Monday morning!

Rahel Baillie and Kate Kenyon explained the role of content strategy in an organisation, and gave an in-depth view of the processes and tools used to transform existing content and knowledge into a profitable business asset. They addressed the question: what exactly is content strategy? And how is it useful to knowledge management. The two presenters had a wealth of experience in this field, gained from working with clients such as Facebook, Tesco, eBay, Cancer Research, Barclaycard, and various government agencies such as the City of Vancouver and the UK’s Department of International Trade.

In the first part of the session, Kate and Rahel looked at what content strategy is, and what it isn’t. They explored how content strategy as a discipline relates to knowledge management within an organisation. They went into detail on how efforts are focused on adding business value through content, and they explained the tools and processes content strategists use during the discovery process.

The second part of the session prided an opportunity to put these tools and processes into effect in a practical session aimed at creating a content strategy. Using a group of independent knowledge management specialists as the “client”, groups used techniques such as needs analysis, a content audit and content engineering to try and create a winning strategy and roadmap.

Speakers

Rahel Baillie has a strong track record of delivering end-to-end content systems in the context of digital strategy projects, often in environments with complex content delivery requirements: the professional who delivers the hard truths and sometimes difficult prescriptions that help organisations leverage their content as a business asset. To achieve this means analysing business problems to see where content is preventing organisations from meeting their business goals, defining content offerings, and then developing systems that integrate various types of content in to a coherent strategy to optimise its production and delivery in a way that allows it to be used to meet the goals of the organisation. See her full profile here: linkedin.com/in/rahelannebailie

Kate Kenyon is a senior content strategist with 15 years of experience solving all the gnarly problems that come with large-scale digital content management. Originally trained as a journalist at the BBC in 2005, she moved from creating content into the much harder challenge of managing it, and has been working in this area ever since. She has worked across the full spectrum of content strategy from writing to governance. Kate has a particular interest in the more technical aspects of content strategy: modelling content into scalable structures, particularly for voice assistants and multiplatform, as well as API definition. Her work has allowed her to work with a wide range of clients including Facebook, eBay, Tesco, Expedia, HSBC, Cancer Research UK, JustGiving, eHarmony and Mumsnet. See her full profile here: linkedin.com/in/katekenyon.

Time and Venue

2pm on 25th July 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

What exactly is content strategy? And how is it useful to knowledge management professionals? This seminar will clarify the role of content strategy in an organisation, and give an in-depth view of the processes and tools used to transform existing content and knowledge into a profitable business asset. Presenters and bring a wealth of experience, gained from working with clients such as Facebook, Tesco, eBay, Cancer Research, Barclaycard, and various government agencies such as the City of Vancouver and the UK’s Department of International Trade. In the first part of the session, Kate and Rahel will begin with a look at what content strategy is, and what it isn’t. They will explore how content strategy as a discipline relates to knowledge management within an organisation. They will go into detail on how efforts are focused on adding business value through content, and explain the tools and processes content strategists use during the discovery process. The second part of the session will be a chance to put these tools and processes into effect in a practical session aimed at creating a content strategy. Using a group of independent knowledge management specialists as the “client”, we will use techniques such as needs analysis, a content audit and content engineering to create a winning strategy and roadmap.
Seminar Objectives:
• To understand what is meant by content strategy
• To determine how useful it is to knowledge management professionals
• To begin to understand how to develop a content strategy

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx99

Blog

See a full seminar report by Conrad Taylor: Content Strategy

Study Suggestions

None available yet

May 2019 Seminar: Information Literacy: Current Ideas and Developments plus NetIKX AGM

Summary

This session provided an opportunity to discuss current ideas and developments relating to information literacy (IL). Last year, CILIP completely overhauled its definition of IL. Unlike the previous version, which was heavily focused on academic skills, the 2018 definition places IL firmly in a broad societal context that no longer resides just within higher education. It states that ‘IL is the ability to think critically and make balanced judgments about any information we find and use. It empowers us as citizens to reach and express informed views and to engage fully with society’.

In the first part of the session, Stéphane Goldstein – who, along with the other presenter, Geoff Walton, contributed to the drafting of the definition – explained why it is so important for IL be situated in different lifecourse contexts; how the definition addresses this; how IL has become particularly pertinent in light of concerns about misinformation, disinformation and ‘fake news’; how it relates to public policy issues and government priorities; and how it dovetails and overlaps with other literacies – digital, media, political – that all contribute to addressing these concerns.

The second part of the session consisted of a reflection, introduced by Geoff Walton, on two case studies examining how young people differ in the ways that they make judgements about information (both psychologically and physiologically) and what can be done to improve their approach. The first looked at how young people make judgements about information and the second gave an overview of a teaching and learning event that enables them to improve their abilities.

In a recent experiment with 18–24 year olds, it was found that those who are good at making well-calibrated judgements about information (we call them high information discerners) are more curious, tend to use multiple sources to verify information, are more likely to be sceptical about information on search engines such as Google, do not regard the first results page as the most trustworthy information and are cognisant of the importance of authority – for example is a web page on medical advice written by a qualified medic or not? Conversely, low information discerners are significantly less likely to be aware of these issues and are generally dismissive of the content put in front of them. These differences are statistically significant.

It was also found that:
1. When presented with mis-information and put under mild stress, higher discerning individuals viewed the situation as more of a challenge, rather than a threat to their well-being.
2. When presented with mis-information, those with higher information discernment levels experienced more favourable (i.e. adaptive and healthy), physiological outcomes. Specifically, individuals with high discernment responded to stress with a more efficient blood flow, equating to a healthier heart response.
3. When given mis-information, higher information discerning individuals responded with more positive emotions before and after the stressful task, in comparison to lower information discerning individuals.
4. High information discerners tend to show high concentration levels and low information discernment exhibit low concentration.

These results have health and well-being implications as well as raising educational and societal concerns. Happily, a number of tools have been devised to help young people improve their information discernment capabilities. Geoff shared these with participants. This was followed by a discussion of their merits and the implications of the various findings.

Speakers

Stephane Goldstein is Executive Director of InformAll (www.informall.org.uk) , a research and policy consultancy that specialises in information and digital literacy and which he founded in 2015. He is the Advocacy and Outreach Officer on CILIP’s Information Literacy Group, and a member of its Knowledge & Information Management Group. Stéphane is an established researcher and research manager, having published reports and articles on information literacy and other themes relating to the information and data environment. He has produced material for organisations in the information world including CILIP, SCONUL and Knowledge Exchange. He set up InformAll with the aim of helping to develop evidence-based awareness of the importance and relevance of information literacy, having previously worked at the Research Information Network, where he undertook and supported projects addressing not just information literacy, but also open access, open science, the role of libraries in supporting research and research data management.

Dr Geoff Walton is Senior Lecturer in the Dept of Languages, Information and Communications at Manchester Metropolitan University and described as one of the top ‘internationally eminent scholars and researchers’ in information literacy. He is Programme Leader for the MA Library & Information Management. Geoff is Chair of the Editorial Board for the Journal of Information Literacy and an Information Literacy Group (ILG) committee member. He is currently writing up the CILIP ILG funded project ‘Information discernment and psychophysiological well-being in response to misinformed stigmatization’. Geoff has also recently completed a British Academy funded project with Dr Ali Pickard and the late Professor Mark Hepworth. He was a librarian (in the voluntary, public and academic sectors) for 23 years before taking up a Senior Lecturer role at Northumbria University. In 2010, Geoff received the SLA Information Professional Europe Award sponsored by Dow Jones. Geoff’s main research interests are: information literacy, information behaviour, Technology Enhanced Learning, health literacy, data literacy and public libraries. He has published six books and many peer reviewed papers.

Time and Venue

2pm on 30th May 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

Last year, CILIP completely overhauled its definition of IL and this meeting will be an opportunity to learn about the changes. See the CILIP press release and the report).

Part one will look at this in light of concerns about misinformation, disinformation and ‘fake news’; how it relates to public policy issues and government priorities; and how it dovetails and overlaps with other literacies – digital, media, political – that all contribute to addressing these concerns.

The second part of the session will look at two case studies that questioned young people about the ways that they make judgments about information and what can be done to improve their approach. The study raised important concerns. Happily, the session will show a number of tools to help young people improve their information discernment capabilities. There will be an opportunity to discuss their merits and what are the implications of our various findings for our workplaces and the information professional’s role.

Our AGM will take place at the end of the meeting.

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx98

Blog

See our blog report: Trust and Integrity in Information

Study Suggestions

Article on Global Trust in Media: https://digiday.com/media/global-state-trust-media-5-charts/

For more information, see the CILIP press release and the report itself.
Geoff Walton’s publications list can be found at: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=UwsIXpUAAAAJ&hl=en

March 2019 Seminar: Open Data

Summary

At this meeting David Penfold gave an introduction to the applications and implications of Open Data and the related topic of Linked Data. As more and more data is generated daily, and even by the minute, how that data is used and what information can be obtained from it becomes more and more significant. An important aspect of this is Open Data and the related topic of Linked Data. This meeting looked at these topics and reviewed how the use of Open and Linked Data can make access to information and how it is used much more powerful.

The meeting mainly consisted of a general (fairly non-technical) introduction to the subject from David Penfold, who gave examples of how open data is used by organisations such as Network Rail. He showed excerpts from presentations Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Sir Nigel Shadbolt and concluded with a consideration of the ethics of Open Data and the implications of AI.

Speaker

Dr David Penfold is vice-chairman of NetIKX and has worked for many years in publishing, with a particular emphasis on content, structured documents and information management within a publishing context. He has previously been Chair of the British Computer Society Electronic Publishing Specialist Group and a Senior Lecturer at the London College of Communication (Deputy Course Director of the MA in Publishing). He is currently Convenor of the terminology Working Group of the ISO Technical Committee on Graphic Technology and a founder member of the recently formed IK SpringBoard, which is working on methods of implementation of the revised CILIP/KPMG report on Information as an Asset.

Time and Venue

2pm on 20th March 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

None

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx97

Blog

See our blog report: Trust and Integrity in Information

Study Suggestions

Article on Global Trust in Media: https://digiday.com/media/global-state-trust-media-5-charts/

January 2019 Seminar: Making and sharing knowledge in communities: can wikis and related tools help?

Summary

At this meeting Andy Mabbett, a hugely experienced Wikipedia editor, gave an introduction to the background of Wikipedia and discussed many of the issues that it raises.
Accumulating, organising and sharing knowledge is never easy; this is the problem Knowledge Management sought to address. Today we hope networked electronic platforms can facilitate the process. They are never enough in themselves, because the issues are essentially human, to do with attitudes, social dynamics and work culture — but good tools certainly help.

In past seminars, NetIKX has looked at MS Sharepoint, but that is proprietary and commercial, and it doesn’t work for wider communities of practice and interest. In this seminar, we looked at a range of alternatives, some of them free of charge and/or open source, together with the social dynamics that make them succeed or fail.
First we looked at the wiki model. The case study was Wikipedia — famous, but poorly understood. Andy Mabbett presented this. Andy is a hugely experienced Wikipedia editor, who inspires respect and affection around the world for his ability to explain how Wikipedia works, and for training novices contributing content – including as a ‘Wikipedian In Residence’ encouraging scientific and cultural organisations to contribute their knowledge to Wikipedia.

A few stats: Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia that anyone can in theory edit, has now survived 18 years, existing on donations and volunteering. It has accumulated over 40 million articles in 301 languages, and about 500 million visitors a month. The English edition has nearly 5.8 million articles. There are about 300,000 active contributors, of whom 4,000 make over a hundred edits annually.

Under the wider banner of ‘Wikimedia’, there are sister projects such as Wiktionary, Wikiversity, which hosts free learning materials, Wikidata, which is developing a large knowledge base, and the Wikimedia Commons, which holds copyright-free photos, audio and other multimedia resources.

And yet, as the Wikipedia article on Wikipedia admits, “Wikipedia has been criticized for exhibiting systemic bias, for presenting a mixture of ‘truths, half truths, and some falsehoods’, and for being subject to manipulation and spin in controversial topics.” This isn’t so surprising, because humans are involved. It’s a community that has had to struggle with issues of authority and quality control, partiality and sundry other pathologies. Andy provided insight into these problems, and explained how the Wikipedia community organises itself to define, defend and implement its values.

No NetIKX seminar would be complete without syndicate sessions, conducted in parallel table groups. For the second half of the afternoon, each group was presented in turn with tales from two further case studies of knowledge sharing using different platforms and operating under different rules. These endeavours might have used email lists, Google Docs, another kind of wiki software, or some other kind of groupware. There were tales of triumph, but of tribulation too.

At the end of the afternoon polling thoughts helped to identify key factors that may point the way towards building better ways of sharing knowledge.

Speakers

Andy Mabbett has been a Wikipedia editor (as User:Pigsonthewing) since 2003 and involved with Wikidata since its inception in 2012. He has given presentations about Wikimedia projects on five continents, and has a great deal of experience working with organisations that wish to engage with Wikipedia and its sister projects. With a background in programming and managing websites for local government, Andy has been ‘Wikimedian in Residence’ at ORCID; TED; the Royal Society of Chemistry; The Physiological Society; the History of Modern Biomedicine Research Group; and various museums, galleries and archives. He is also the author of three books on the rock band Pink Floyd.

Our case-study witnesses

Sara Culpin is currently Head of Information & Knowledge at CRU International, where she has implemented a successful information and knowledge strategy on a shoestring budget. Since graduating from Loughborough University, she has spent over 25 years in information and knowledge roles at Aon, AT Kearney, PwC, and Deloitte. She is passionate about getting colleagues to share their knowledge across their organisations, while ensuring that their senior managers see the business value. https://www.linkedin.com/in/sara-culpin-2a1b051

Dr Richard Millwood has a background in school maths education, with a history of applying computers to education, and is Director of Core Education UK. As a researcher in the School of Computer Science & Statistics, Trinity College Dublin, he is developing a community of practice for computer science teachers in Ireland and creating workshops for families to develop creative use of computers together. In the 1990s Richard worked with Professor Stephen Heppell to create Ultralab, the learning technology research centre at Anglia Polytechnic University, acting as head 2005–2007. He researched innovation in online higher education in the Institute for Educational Cybernetics at the University of Bolton until 2013, gaining a PhD by Practice in ‘The Design of Learner-centred, Technology-enhanced Education’.

Time and Venue

2pm on 24th January 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

None

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx96

Blog

See our blog report: Trust and Integrity in Information

Study Suggestions

Article on Global Trust in Media: https://digiday.com/media/global-state-trust-media-5-charts/