October 2020 Seminar: From Hawley to the Edge of Intelligence : the continuing evolution of Knowledge and Information Management to adapt to the new normal

Summary

This seminar was all about the ‘Financial Times’ survey entitled ‘The edge of intelligence’ published in early March 2020.  Stephen Phillips is a member of CILIP, the Library and Information Association, which worked with the ‘Financial Times’ to commission a survey of its readers. The purpose of this was to build a better understanding of their perception of knowledge and information management.  This exercise followed on from the release in 2019, of ‘Information as an Asset’,  an update of an earlier report from the mid-1990s issued by the Hawley Committee.  NetIKX has always been deeply involved with this work and therefore wanted to provide an overview of the new report and how it had developed from the previous Hawley Report.  Stephen also discussed the ‘Key findings of Dell’s recent Digital Transformation Index’ which emphasised the importance of knowledge sharing, extraction of insights from data, skills in data analysis and related disciplines and the need to make business decisions based on data in real time.

The seminar therefore gave the audience an opportunity to reflect on the key findings of the survey and then discuss the practical ways that Knowledge and Information Managers can help their organisations going forward, through the pandemic, constantly maintaining and building on their success.

Speaker:

Stephen Phillips is the owner of Smart IM Ltd which he has created following on from a highly successful thirty year career in the financial services industry where he developed and implemented KM and IM strategy, 3rd party data sourcing and management and onshore/offshore staffing models. He has a track record of innovative use of technology to shape and manage workflows, 3rd party inventory, entitlements, credentials and usage tracking, machine translation and KM platforms. Smart IM provides strategic support to deliver these capabilities, including research, information and knowledge management solutions.

Stephen believes that world class Knowledge and Information Management enables good decision making and competitive advantage. Organisations can be helped to address four strategic imperatives : to increase revenues; to reduce costs; to mitigate risks and to comply with legal and regulatory obligations.
Stephen is 2021 Conference Chair for SLA Europe and Vice Chair of CILIP’s Knowledge and Information Management Member Network. He has previously served as President of the European Chapter of SLA and actively contributes to industry events and journals.

In his spare time, Stephen is a school trustee, he is a keen golfer, he likes to vacation in Portugal with his family and he enjoys long walks with Reggie, his Airedale terrier “discussing life, the universe and everything” …

Time and Venue

22nd October 2020 at 2:30 pm on the Zoom platform. This is a virtual session.

Slides

Will be made available after the session for members only.

Tweets

#netikx106

Blog

See our blog report: Information as an Asset and the Hawley Report

Study Suggestions

1995 Information as an Asset : the board agenda – https://cilip.org.uk/informationasset
2019 Information as an Asset Today’s board Agenda – https://cilip.org.uk/informationasset
2020 The Edge of Intelligence – https://intelligence.ft.com
Covid Impact on The Workplace – https://www.thebcfa.com/bcfa-covid-19-impact-survey
McKinsey : COVID Response Center – https://www.mckinsey.com/about-us/covid-response-center/home
Dell Digital Transformation Index – https://www.delltechnologies.com/en-us/perspectives/digital-transformation-index.htm

September 2020 Seminar: TRIZ and how it can be applied to Knowledge and Information Management

Summary

This meeting introduced the little-known methodology with Russian origins, called TRIZ. Patterns that were uncovered while delving deep into the patents database during work in Russia revealed around 100 concepts, principles, and strategies that they believe will help to solve any problem. Ron has extensive experience using TRIZ in a huge range of different situations and brought his passion and expertise to pull together some fascinating examples of TRIZ being used in practical situations.  After we had absorbed all the ideas he was explaining, we had wonderful networking sessions to discuss what might be relevant to our own work situations.  Audience members left eager to see what they would apply on Monday morning, where Ron had assured us would have the capacity to think like a genius! It was a lively and productive session and even if we fail to deliver at genius level, we had certainly gained fascinating insights into a more systematic way of looking at the problem solving needed for complex situations.

Speaker

Ron Donaldson is a freelance Knowledge Ecologist. Ron has a strong environmental background that includes 21 years with English Nature and an Honours Degree in Combined Sciences.

Beginning his career in systems and process improvement he was drawn towards the anthropological, people and community aspects of knowledge management within which he gained quite a high profile speaking (and facilitating workshops) about the application of story telling and complexity thinking.

He now takes an ecological view of organisational change by placing emphasis on communities and the knowledge and ideas that flow within and between them. His approach to facilitation then creates the conditions for revealing and self-realising the sense made of the stories being told. All of this is done with a deep understanding of the unpredictable nature of complex systems and some of the latest thinking in the Cognitive Sciences.

In the last 10 years as a self-employed knowledge ecologist he has absorbed methods and ideas from an even wider range of disciplines from problem solving to open innovation design thinking, collaborative community building through to using narrative frameworks to communicate complex ideas.

He believes his strongest asset is having a foot in, and being accepted by, several very different networks, from environmental story tellers, engineers, conservationists and groups working for social change, and in doing so identifying and transferring the best insights between them.

Ron introduced us to the basic principles and insights behind TRIZ and then shared with us a couple of techniques for us to familiarize ourselves and apply during the syndicate session.

Time and Venue

30th September 2020 2:30pm on the Zoom platform. This is a virtual session.

Slides

Will be made available to members soon

Tweets

#netikx105

Blog

See our blog report: TRIZ

Study Suggestions

Study suggestions : It has already been mentioned but the most important area of study is the Oxford Creativity website at : https://www.triz.co.uk
This contains a cornucopia of information and resources and educational material, much of which is free of charge.
Other sites which carry selective examples of the TRIZ methodology are :
http://www.triz40.com/aff_Principles_TRIZ.php

http://www.triz40.com/aff_Matrix_TRIZ.php

The following paperbacks explain TRIZ in detail :
TRIZ for Engineers : Enabling Inventive Problem Solving by Karen Gadd.
Wiley, 2011. ISBN 978-0470741887. This is also available in a Kindle Edition.

TRIZ for Dummies by Lilly Haines-Gadd. For Dummies, 2016.
ISBN 978-1119107477. This is also available in a Kindle Edition and as an Audiobook.

Rob Rosset 13/10/2020

July 2020 Seminar: Time critical user centred library web design

Summary

Antony Groves, from the University of Sussex gave a lively account of how his team have made ten changes to the library website since lockdown. He talked about benchmarking, user surveys and feedback and plenty of iterations to get things right.
They have had two aims: to make the site accessible to meet Government requirements and also to make the site as useful as possible during the lockdown period. This was a huge challenge in difficult circumstances, but the efforts were rewarded by a ‘Customer Service Excellence’ award.  Antony gave us sufficient details to really bring home the challenges that were faced by librarians in the lockdown, particularly in the specific context of the range of users who needed resources for their study, research and their daily tasks. NetIKX members have commented on how valuable the session was for their own work in this area and there were plenty of questions to Antony to complete the session.

Speaker

Antony Groves is Learning & Teaching Librarian in the Academic Services department at the University of Sussex. He is the  person who co-ordinates teaching for undergraduates and taught postgraduates across all schools of study. This includes embedded teaching, providing student support and organising the Digital Tuesday’s programme.  He has developed the Library website, Library Subject Guides, Skills Hub and curated content for LinkedIn Learning; and supports students in using the Library resources and services.  He also runs a Library chat service and also blogs for CILIP’s Multimedia Information and Technology Group.
He is a Fellow of the HEA and committee member for CILIPs MmIT.

Time and Venue

2.30 pm Wednesday 22 July 2020. Antony’s talk was delivered via Zoom.

Tweets

#netikx104

Slides

Slides will be available to members soon

Blog

See our blog report: A Library during lockdown

Study Suggestions

MMIT blog: https://mmitblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/16/revisiting-ranganathan-part-1

MMIT blog: https://mmitblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/19/revisiting-ranganathan-part-2

MMIT blog: https://www.visucius.org/2020/07/27/time-critical-user-centred-library-web-design/

May 2020 Seminar: How do we thrive in a hyper-connected, complex world?

Summary

This meeting was a regular Knowledge Café that David Gurteen held especially for NetIKX members.  We heard David set out the reasons he felt the world had changed beyond all recognition since the second world war.  He listed the familiar story of the internet, transport advances, global finances and social media but also more unexpected aspects that give our world a new complexity. Then he invited us into break-out groups to share our own ideas on this fascinating topic.  After a break, David focused our attention on his favoured area of expertise; the need for new leadership styles and the power of conversation. He was very clear that people did not need a title of leader to develop the power of leadership. We joined second break-outs to take our networking further.  Then we shared ideas in a stimulating plenary. The meeting showed the value of the Knowledge Café approach, but also was a masterclass in using Zoom as the communication media.  NetIKX will take the ideas and the methods forward for the future.

Speakers

David Gurteen is a writer, speaker, and conversational facilitator. The focus of his work is Conversational Leadership – a style of working where we appreciate the power of conversation and take a conversational approach to the way that we connect, relate, learn and work with each other. He is the creator of the Knowledge Café – a conversational process to bring a group of people together to learn from each other, build relationships and make a better sense of a rapidly changing, complex, less predictable world. He has facilitated hundreds of Knowledge Cafés and workshops in over 30 countries around the world over the past 20 years. He is also the founder of the Gurteen Knowledge Community – a global network of over 20,000 people in 160 countries. Currently, he is writing an online book on Conversational Leadership. You can join a Knowledge Café if you consult his website.

Time and Venue

2pm on 20th May 2020, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

The seminar was announced via the NetIKX website and explained that the seminar would be presented using the Zoom platform.

Slides

Not available.

Tweets

There were no Tweets from this meeting as we got used to our new ‘Zoom’ format.

Blog

See our blog report: Gurteen knowledge cafe

Study Suggestions

Visit David’s website: Gurteen Knowledge at www.gurteen.com

This site includes KM book reviews, news and useful quotations.

You can sign up for David’s regular newsletter from this site.

January 2020 Seminar: Virtual working and learning: is it working for you?

Summary

NetIKX had a dazzling meeting with Paul Corney, President-elect of CILIP, showing his wealth of knowledge about meetings of all kinds, and specifically virtual meetings.  The presentation ranged from detailed analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of technology packages – where he pulled out some surprising issues to watch out for – to the preparation and etiquette that makes humans effective when working together at a distance.  That was to be expected from someone who had once been managed by a boss located on the far side of the globe!  The meeting culminated in a vote among those present to find our most useful takeaways.   To learn what we decided, please look at our blog! All in all, the seminar featured lots of fun and instructive anecdotes, takeaways for the workplace, and finally networking with refreshments – it turned out to be a perfect NetIKX event.

Speakers

Paul Corney is Managing Director of Knowledge et al. A long-time business consultant with broad global experience, he spent 25 years in London as Senior Manager at Saudi International Bank and as Vice President at Zurich Reinsurance before becoming the Strategy & Business Advisor to the CEO of a dotcom software organization (Sopheon PLC) and Information & Knowledge Advisor to the CEO of a leading reinsurance broker (BMS Group). As such, he was one of the first ‘knowledge managers’ in London. Outside of work, Corney is a founding trustee of PlanZheores, a London-based charitable organization whose aim is to make good use of surplus food. He regularly speaks and holds Master Classes at international events on information and knowledge management and is a member of the British Standards Institute KM Standards Committee (KMS/1).

Time and Venue

Wednesday 29th January 2020. 2pm The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

Following Paul’s presentation, we will have a group exercise where we will sketch a typology of virtual meeting scenarios, technologies that may underpin them, and what they make either easy or difficult. We’ll also share our own experiences of virtual meeting spaces and try to find rules of thumb whereby we can make such gatherings work better. There will then be an opportunity to network over drinks and nibbles.  Do come along and join us, as we haven’t yet found a technology for pouring a complimentary glass of wine for remote participants!

Slides

Not available.

Keeping the show on the road in a virtual world

Tweets

#netikx101

Blog

See our blog report: Keeping the show on the road in a virtual world

 

Study Suggestions

Paul Corney’s website ‘knowledge et al‘ provides information about the books he has written including the jointly authored The KM Cookbook.  You can read ‘why & how we wrote it’.

You may wish to look at Erin Meyer’s website.  Her work, as mentioned in Paul’s speech, focuses on how the world’s most successful leaders navigate the complexities of cultural differences in a multicultural environment.

November 2019 Seminar: Useful evidence: getting research evidence valued and used.

Summary

At this meeting Jonathan Breckon of the Alliance for Useful Evidence explained the role of his organisation. It is a network, hosted by the UK’s innovation charity Nesta, the government’s vehicle for designing, testing and scaling new solutions to some identified problems. These organisations champion the smarter use of evidence in social policy and practice. They do this through advocacy, convening events, sharing ideas and resources, and supporting individuals and organisations through advice and training. The work is promoted through an open access network of more than 4,300 individuals from across government, universities, charities, businesses, and local authorities in the UK and internationally which we could all join for free. He then described the COM-B framework for encouraging research use, developed by researchers at UCL, and adopted by a range of foundations and government agencies in UK and overseas.

COM-B is a ‘behaviour system’ involving three essential conditions: Capability, Opportunity and Motivation and it forms the hub of a ‘behaviour change wheel’ (BCW), around which are positioned the nine intervention functions aimed at addressing deficits in one or more of these conditions; around this are placed seven categories of policy that could enable those interventions to occur. It has been used in a number of applications, mainly health related. We looked at ways to improve hearing-aid use in adult auditory rehabilitation. He also presented the factors that influence medication-taking behaviour, a tobacco control strategy, and the NICE Obesity Guidelines.

We learned that research evidence is just one factor that can influence decision-making at a policy and practice level. Various interventions have been developed to enhance and support the use of research evidence by decision-makers. Jonathan explained that in order to decide which interventions are most effective, there had been a systematic review of research into research use, leading to these new methods for characterising and designing behaviour change intervention. He provided us with some practical tips on the best mechanisms for more generally getting research evidence valued and used. This then led into small group discussions where we were given time to consider what was relevant to our own organisations and how we could make use of these insights within their own work programmes.

Speakers

Jonathan Breckon has been the Director of The Alliance for Useful Evidence since it was created at Nesta in 2012. Formerly Director of Policy and Public Affairs at the Arts and Humanities Research Council, he has had policy roles at the Royal Geographical Society, the British Academy, and Universities UK. He is a member of the Cabinet Office What Works Council and a Director of the Department for Education’s What Works for Children’s Social Care. His research and professional interests cover politics and psychology, particularly the relationship between evidence and policy-making. He is a Visiting Professor at Strathclyde University and a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at King’s College London’s Policy Institute. His research and professional interests cover politics and psychology, the relationship between evidence and policy-making, and the role of professional bodies, such as medical Royal Colleges, in applying evidence-based practice. When not at work, or being ordered around by two young children, he wastes time protecting his family’s veg garden from slugs or finding excuses to go sailing in the Solent.

Time and Venue

2pm on 21st November 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx100

Blog

There is no blog report for this seminar.

Study Suggestions

Nesta Website: https://www.nesta.org.uk/

July 2019 Seminar: Using content strategy to meet your business goals: content strategy at work

Summary

The seminar in July received very positive feedback. The two speakers were able to present their different perspectives on this practical topic with expertise and they coordinated together like the perfect double act! The audience learnt from first hand experience how to work through the four stages of Content Strategy development, and then had a chance to question the speakers so that the presentation could be directly linked to current real life examples. There was a final syndicate session that gave all present the opportunity to try their skills in a potential problem situation. Several of the audience members commented that what they had learnt from the session was immediately applicable to their own work situations and therefore would be in use by Monday morning!

Rahel Baillie and Kate Kenyon explained the role of content strategy in an organisation, and gave an in-depth view of the processes and tools used to transform existing content and knowledge into a profitable business asset. They addressed the question: what exactly is content strategy? And how is it useful to knowledge management. The two presenters had a wealth of experience in this field, gained from working with clients such as Facebook, Tesco, eBay, Cancer Research, Barclaycard, and various government agencies such as the City of Vancouver and the UK’s Department of International Trade.

In the first part of the session, Kate and Rahel looked at what content strategy is, and what it isn’t. They explored how content strategy as a discipline relates to knowledge management within an organisation. They went into detail on how efforts are focused on adding business value through content, and they explained the tools and processes content strategists use during the discovery process.

The second part of the session prided an opportunity to put these tools and processes into effect in a practical session aimed at creating a content strategy. Using a group of independent knowledge management specialists as the “client”, groups used techniques such as needs analysis, a content audit and content engineering to try and create a winning strategy and roadmap.

Speakers

Rahel Baillie has a strong track record of delivering end-to-end content systems in the context of digital strategy projects, often in environments with complex content delivery requirements: the professional who delivers the hard truths and sometimes difficult prescriptions that help organisations leverage their content as a business asset. To achieve this means analysing business problems to see where content is preventing organisations from meeting their business goals, defining content offerings, and then developing systems that integrate various types of content in to a coherent strategy to optimise its production and delivery in a way that allows it to be used to meet the goals of the organisation. See her full profile here: linkedin.com/in/rahelannebailie

Kate Kenyon is a senior content strategist with 15 years of experience solving all the gnarly problems that come with large-scale digital content management. Originally trained as a journalist at the BBC in 2005, she moved from creating content into the much harder challenge of managing it, and has been working in this area ever since. She has worked across the full spectrum of content strategy from writing to governance. Kate has a particular interest in the more technical aspects of content strategy: modelling content into scalable structures, particularly for voice assistants and multiplatform, as well as API definition. Her work has allowed her to work with a wide range of clients including Facebook, eBay, Tesco, Expedia, HSBC, Cancer Research UK, JustGiving, eHarmony and Mumsnet.

Time and Venue

2pm on 25th July 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

What exactly is content strategy? And how is it useful to knowledge management professionals? This seminar will clarify the role of content strategy in an organisation, and give an in-depth view of the processes and tools used to transform existing content and knowledge into a profitable business asset. Presenters will bring a wealth of experience, gained from working with clients such as Facebook, Tesco, eBay, Cancer Research, Barclaycard, and various government agencies such as the City of Vancouver and the UK’s Department of International Trade. In the first part of the session, Kate and Rahel will begin with a look at what content strategy is, and what it isn’t. They will explore how content strategy as a discipline relates to knowledge management within an organisation. They will go into detail on how efforts are focused on adding business value through content, and explain the tools and processes content strategists use during the discovery process. The second part of the session will be a chance to put these tools and processes into effect in a practical session aimed at creating a content strategy. Using a group of independent knowledge management specialists as the “client”, we will use techniques such as needs analysis, a content audit and content engineering to create a winning strategy and roadmap.
Seminar Objectives:
• To understand what is meant by content strategy
• To determine how useful it is to knowledge management professionals
• To begin to understand how to develop a content strategy

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx99

Blog

See our blog report: Content strategy

Study Suggestions

None available

May 2019 Seminar: Information Literacy: Current Ideas and Developments plus NetIKX AGM

Summary

This session provided an opportunity to discuss current ideas and developments relating to information literacy (IL). Last year, CILIP completely overhauled its definition of IL. Unlike the previous version, which was heavily focused on academic skills, the 2018 definition places IL firmly in a broad societal context that no longer resides just within higher education. It states that ‘IL is the ability to think critically and make balanced judgments about any information we find and use. It empowers us as citizens to reach and express informed views and to engage fully with society’.

In the first part of the session, Stéphane Goldstein – who, along with the other presenter, Geoff Walton, contributed to the drafting of the definition – explained why it is so important for IL to be situated in different life-course contexts; how the definition addresses this; how IL has become particularly pertinent in light of concerns about misinformation, disinformation and ‘fake news’; how it relates to public policy issues and government priorities; and how it dovetails and overlaps with other literacies – digital, media, political – that all contribute to addressing these concerns.

The second part of the session consisted of a reflection, introduced by Geoff Walton, on two case studies examining how young people differ in the ways that they make judgements about information (both psychologically and physiologically) and what can be done to improve their approach. The first looked at how young people make judgements about information and the second gave an overview of a teaching and learning event that enables them to improve their abilities.

In a recent experiment with 18–24 year olds, it was found that those who are good at making well-calibrated judgements about information (we call them high information discerners) are more curious, tend to use multiple sources to verify information, are more likely to be sceptical about information on search engines such as Google, do not regard the first results page as the most trustworthy information and are cognisant of the importance of authority – for example is a web page on medical advice written by a qualified medic or not? Conversely, low information discerners are significantly less likely to be aware of these issues and are generally dismissive of the content put in front of them. These differences are statistically significant.

It was also found that:
1. When presented with mis-information and put under mild stress, higher discerning individuals viewed the situation as more of a challenge, rather than a threat to their well-being.
2. When presented with mis-information, those with higher information discernment levels experienced more favourable (i.e. adaptive and healthy), physiological outcomes. Specifically, individuals with high discernment responded to stress with a more efficient blood flow, equating to a healthier heart response.
3. When given mis-information, higher information discerning individuals responded with more positive emotions before and after the stressful task, in comparison to lower information discerning individuals.
4. High information discerners tend to show high concentration levels and low information discerners exhibit low concentration.

These results have health and well-being implications as well as raising educational and societal concerns. Happily, a number of tools have been devised to help young people improve their information discernment capabilities. Geoff shared these with participants. This was followed by a discussion of their merits and the implications of the various findings.

Speakers

Stephane Goldstein is Executive Director of InformAll (www.informall.org.uk) , a research and policy consultancy that specialises in information and digital literacy and which he founded in 2015. He is the Advocacy and Outreach Officer on CILIP’s Information Literacy Group, and a member of its Knowledge & Information Management Group. Stéphane is an established researcher and research manager, having published reports and articles on information literacy and other themes relating to the information and data environment. He has produced material for organisations in the information world including CILIP, SCONUL and Knowledge Exchange. He set up InformAll with the aim of helping to develop evidence-based awareness of the importance and relevance of information literacy, having previously worked at the Research Information Network, where he undertook and supported projects addressing not just information literacy, but also open access, open science, the role of libraries in supporting research and research data management.

Dr Geoff Walton is Senior Lecturer in the Dept of Languages, Information and Communications at Manchester Metropolitan University and described as one of the top ‘internationally eminent scholars and researchers’ in information literacy. He is Programme Leader for the MA Library & Information Management. Geoff is Chair of the Editorial Board for the Journal of Information Literacy and an Information Literacy Group (ILG) committee member. He is currently writing up the CILIP ILG funded project ‘Information discernment and psychophysiological well-being in response to misinformed stigmatization’. Geoff has also recently completed a British Academy funded project with Dr Ali Pickard and the late Professor Mark Hepworth. He was a librarian (in the voluntary, public and academic sectors) for 23 years before taking up a Senior Lecturer role at Northumbria University. In 2010, Geoff received the SLA Information Professional Europe Award sponsored by Dow Jones. Geoff’s main research interests are: information literacy, information behaviour, Technology Enhanced Learning, health literacy, data literacy and public libraries. He has published six books and many peer reviewed papers.

Time and Venue

2pm on 30th May 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

Last year, CILIP completely overhauled its definition of IL and this meeting will be an opportunity to learn about the changes. See the CILIP press release and the report).

Part one will look at this in light of concerns about misinformation, disinformation and ‘fake news’; how it relates to public policy issues and government priorities; and how it dovetails and overlaps with other literacies – digital, media, political – that all contribute to addressing these concerns.

The second part of the session will look at two case studies that questioned young people about the ways that they make judgments about information and what can be done to improve their approach. The study raised important concerns. Happily, the session will show a number of tools to help young people improve their information discernment capabilities. There will be an opportunity to discuss their merits and what are the implications of our various findings for our workplaces and the information professional’s role.

Our AGM will take place at the end of the meeting.

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx98

Blog

See our blog report: Information Literacy

Study Suggestions

The Information Literacy Website, brought to you by the CILIP Information Literacy Group is called: infolit.org.uk where you can find more information including the CILIP press release and the report itself.

Geoff Walton’s publications list can be found at: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=UwsIXpUAAAAJ&hl=en

March 2019 Seminar: Open Data

Summary

At this meeting David Penfold gave an introduction to the applications and implications of Open Data and the related topic of Linked Data. As more and more data is generated daily, and even by the minute, how that data is used and what information can be obtained from it becomes more and more significant. An important aspect of this is Open Data and the related topic of Linked Data. This meeting looked at these topics and reviewed how the use of Open and Linked Data can make access to information and how it is used much more powerful.

The meeting mainly consisted of a general (fairly non-technical) introduction to the subject from David Penfold, who gave examples of how open data is used by organisations such as Network Rail. He showed excerpts from presentations from Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Sir Nigel Shadbolt and concluded with a consideration of the ethics of Open Data and the implications of AI.

Speaker

Dr David Penfold is vice-chairman of NetIKX and has worked for many years in publishing, with a particular emphasis on content, structured documents and information management within a publishing context. He has previously been Chair of the British Computer Society Electronic Publishing Specialist Group and a Senior Lecturer at the London College of Communication (Deputy Course Director of the MA in Publishing). He is currently Convenor of the terminology Working Group of the ISO Technical Committee on Graphic Technology and a founder member of the recently formed IK SpringBoard, which is working on methods of implementation of the revised CILIP/KPMG report on Information as an Asset.

Time and Venue

2pm on 20th March 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

None

Slides

No slides available for this presentation

Tweets

#netikx97

Blog

A report has been posted on the NetIKX blog

Study Suggestions

Have a look at the website for the Open Data Institute https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=open+data+institute

January 2019 Seminar: Making and sharing knowledge in communities: can wikis and related tools help?

Summary

At this meeting Andy Mabbett, a hugely experienced Wikipedia editor, gave an introduction to the background of Wikipedia and discussed many of the issues that it raises.
Accumulating, organising and sharing knowledge is never easy; this is the problem Knowledge Management sought to address. Today we hope networked electronic platforms can facilitate the process. They are never enough in themselves, because the issues are essentially human, to do with attitudes, social dynamics and work culture — but good tools certainly help.

In past seminars, NetIKX has looked at MS Sharepoint, but that is proprietary and commercial, and it doesn’t work for wider communities of practice and interest. In this seminar, we looked at a range of alternatives, some of them free of charge and/or open source, together with the social dynamics that make them succeed or fail.
First we looked at the wiki model. The case study was Wikipedia — famous, but poorly understood. Andy Mabbett presented this. Andy is a hugely experienced Wikipedia editor, who inspires respect and affection around the world for his ability to explain how Wikipedia works, and for training novices contributing content – including as a ‘Wikipedian In Residence’ encouraging scientific and cultural organisations to contribute their knowledge to Wikipedia.

A few stats: Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia that anyone can in theory edit, has now survived 18 years, existing on donations and volunteering. It has accumulated over 40 million articles in 301 languages, and about 500 million visitors a month. The English edition has nearly 5.8 million articles. There are about 300,000 active contributors, of whom 4,000 make over a hundred edits annually.

Under the wider banner of ‘Wikimedia’, there are sister projects such as Wiktionary, Wikiversity, which hosts free learning materials, Wikidata, which is developing a large knowledge base, and the Wikimedia Commons, which holds copyright-free photos, audio and other multimedia resources.

And yet, as the Wikipedia article on Wikipedia admits, “Wikipedia has been criticized for exhibiting systemic bias, for presenting a mixture of ‘truths, half truths, and some falsehoods’, and for being subject to manipulation and spin in controversial topics.” This isn’t so surprising, because humans are involved. It’s a community that has had to struggle with issues of authority and quality control, partiality and sundry other pathologies. Andy provided insight into these problems, and explained how the Wikipedia community organises itself to define, defend and implement its values.

No NetIKX seminar would be complete without syndicate sessions, conducted in parallel table groups. For the second half of the afternoon, each group was presented in turn with tales from two further case studies of knowledge sharing using different platforms and operating under different rules. These endeavours might have used email lists, Google Docs, another kind of wiki software, or some other kind of groupware. There were tales of triumph, but of tribulation too.

At the end of the afternoon polling thoughts helped to identify key factors that may point the way towards building better ways of sharing knowledge.

Speakers

Andy Mabbett has been a Wikipedia editor (as User:Pigsonthewing) since 2003 and involved with Wikidata since its inception in 2012. He has given presentations about Wikimedia projects on five continents, and has a great deal of experience working with organisations that wish to engage with Wikipedia and its sister projects. With a background in programming and managing websites for local government, Andy has been ‘Wikimedian in Residence’ at ORCID; TED; the Royal Society of Chemistry; The Physiological Society; the History of Modern Biomedicine Research Group; and various museums, galleries and archives. He is also the author of three books on the rock band Pink Floyd.

Our case-study witnesses

Sara Culpin is currently Head of Information & Knowledge at CRU International, where she has implemented a successful information and knowledge strategy on a shoestring budget. Since graduating from Loughborough University, she has spent over 25 years in information and knowledge roles at Aon, AT Kearney, PwC, and Deloitte. She is passionate about getting colleagues to share their knowledge across their organisations, while ensuring that their senior managers see the business value. https://www.linkedin.com/in/sara-culpin-2a1b051

Dr Richard Millwood has a background in school maths education, with a history of applying computers to education, and is Director of Core Education UK. As a researcher in the School of Computer Science & Statistics, Trinity College Dublin, he is developing a community of practice for computer science teachers in Ireland and creating workshops for families to develop creative use of computers together. In the 1990s Richard worked with Professor Stephen Heppell to create Ultralab, the learning technology research centre at Anglia Polytechnic University, acting as head 2005–2007. He researched innovation in online higher education in the Institute for Educational Cybernetics at the University of Bolton until 2013, gaining a PhD by Practice in ‘The Design of Learner-centred, Technology-enhanced Education’.

Time and Venue

2pm on 24th January 2019, The British Dental Association, 64 Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YS

Pre Event Information

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Slides

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Blog

See our blog report: Wikipedia & knowledge sharing

Study Suggestions

Andy Mabbett, experienced Wikipedian

Andy Mabbett is an experienced editor of Wikipedia with more than a million edits to his name. Here’s a link to a ‘Wikijabber’ audio interview with Andy by Sebastian Wallroth (Sept 2017)
https://wikijabber.com/wikijabber-0005-with-pigsonthewing/